Start Your DBA

Start with the right business structure

Answer a few easy questions to help you decide which one may be your best choice

Make a Name for Yourself With a DBA

When starting a business there are many things to consider, and your company name is a big decision. As a business owner, if you plan on operating the business under a name different than its legal one, you need to register it as a DBA, or ‘Doing Business As’. For example, if your legal name is ‘ABC Distributing’ but you are calling this particular business ‘XY Office Supplies’, you would need to file a DBA. It doesn’t matter what type of business entity you have; a corporation, sole proprietorship, LLC, and a non-profit can all have a DBA.

It only takes a 2-step filing process to start a DBA, which makes the process painless and simple. At DoMyLLC, we make sure that all the proper paperwork is filled out properly so that you can concentrate on the rest of the business tasks.

Basics

Benefits

Taxes

Why

Why Choose Us?

    DoMyLLC is a company that is concerned with your success and your accomplishments. Unlike some of our competition, we work with your best interests in mind. Some reasons to choose us include:

  • We offer live support to assist you
  • Our customer service is excellent
  • We offer friendly prices and will price match any other company
  • We have a 100% satisfaction guarantee
Schedule a free consultation/Speak to Specialist

Advantages of a DBA

A major advantage of a DBA is that the company maintains a professional presence no matter where its home base is. For example, companies that are run out of a home or small office tend to benefit from using a DBA. Using a DBA also has good advertising potential when looking to build a brand. Another advantage is that one owner can have multiple businesses while operating from one central control. Find out more about DBA benefits here .

Comparison Chart

LLC

C-Corp

S-Corp

DBA

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

LLC’s provide personal liability and asset protection. Members (owners) are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

C-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors, and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

S-Corps provide personal liability and asset protection. Officers, Directors and Shareholders are not held personally liable for the debts of the company.

Owners have no personal liability or asset protection. Owners are held personally liable for the debts of the company.

A DBA is only a name or brand as opposed to a business entity, which means that it offers no legal protection. The comparison chart assumes that the DBA was registered by a sole proprietor, and the tax advantages/disadvantages would change depending on the business structure the DBA was filed under. Visit the for more tax information.

FAQ

A DBA means ‘Doing Business As’, and it is required when an owner wants a company to run under a different name than the legal one. It is also known as a ‘Fictitious Name’, ‘Assumed Name’, and ‘Trade Name’.

A DBA can help a company build a brand name and it can be used through every growth level of the company.

Any business entity can form a DBA, including a partnership, LLC, sole proprietorship, professional corporation, corporation, non-profit corporation, and S corporation.

For a complete list of FAQ, please visit.

Ready to Start Your DBA?

If you are ready to file a DBA, we are here to help. We handle all of the paperwork, and all we need from you is $99 plus any required state fees. It is a simple 2-step process and once you complete and sign the required documents, leave the rest to us and you can focus on growing your business.

Package Includes:

  • Name Availability Check
  • Filed DBA Documents
  • Publication if Required in Your Jurisdiction

If you are interested in starting a DBA, give our office a call at 888-366-9552.